Catalogue of the Art Treasures of the United Kingdom, Collected at Manchester in 1857; A Companion to the Official Catalogue

Catalogue of the Art Treasures of the United Kingdom, Collected at Manchester in 1857; A Companion to the Official Catalogue

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ...19, 20, and 21, contributed by Apsley Pellatt, Esq., and G. Nicholson, Esq. One of the most interesting pieces in the Collection perhaps is an Arabian glass-lamp contributed by J. W. Wyld, Esq., as it is the oldest example in the Collection of the Mediaeval period, (No. 22). It is to be remarked that in the arts of glass-making, pottery, and metal work, as seen, even by the examples collected in this Museum, the East preceded and excelled the West in works of industrial Art. WALL CASE A. Contains a great variety of objects for personal and domestic use, amongst which are interesting examples of bridal knives, worn by ladies during the sixteenth century (No. 1). "Fortune doth give this bridal knifo, To cut the thread of life if't be not free." These are contributed by Mr. Mills, of Norwich. Here also are to be seen combs richly carved and inscribed, mostly made, it is supposed, in the north of France or south of Holland. Excellent specimens are contributed by the Rev. Walter Sneyd, W. Tite, M.P., and the Trustees of the Ashmolean Museum (No. 2). The Rev. Mr. Staniforth, and Messrs Ollivant and Potsford, send some excellent baptismal spoons (No. 8), a custom once in fashion, from whence the well-known expression of being born with a gold or silver spoon in his mouth. A Horn-book, in its old setting, contributed by Admiral Shifnall (No. i). A common shoe (No. 5), rendered interesting by incised ornament, and the date in choice Latin, Anno Domini, 1595. The richly-carved wood-sheaths for knives, &c., bear witness to their origin in High Dutch inscriptions (No. 6). Next come watches and chatelaines, such as were worn by the beaux and belles of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Jewellery of the Renaissance and succeeding epochs, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236541685
  • 9781236541680