Catalogue of Antiquities in the Museum of the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society at Devizes

Catalogue of Antiquities in the Museum of the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society at Devizes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...Tene 1 type. West Lavington Down, 1857. Rev. E. Wilton. W.A.M., xxxv., 400, fig. 14. 301. PI. XXi. 2. Bow of Bronze Brooch, pin and spring lost; foot knobbed and turned back to meet bow; bow slightly engraved with lines and dots. LateCeltic, La Tene 1 type. Length 1fin. Near Bush Barrow, Salisbury Plain. Rev. E. Wilton. W.A.M., xxxv., 399, fig. 7. 302. PI. Xxi. 3. Bronze Brooch; bow, catch, and one turn of spring only; row of minute dots with engraved line on either side on bow. Late-Celtic, La Tene 1 type. Length 1fin. Flint diggers, West Lavington Down. Rev. E. Wilton. W.A.M., xxxv., fig. 8. 303. PI. XXi. 4. Bow of Bronze Brooch; pin and spring lost. Foot knobbed and turned back to meet bow. Bow ornamented on side with stamped dots. LateCeltic, La Tene 1 type. Length 1fin. Flint diggers, West Lavington. Rev. E. Wilton. W.A.M., xxxv., 399, fig. 9. 304. PI. Xxi. 6. Bronze Bow Brooch, complete. Late Celtic, La Tene 1 type. The bow has a central hollow moulding with engraved lines on either side, the foot has a flat knob with bifid beak turned back and touching the bow. A solid bronze axis runs through the coils. Length 1J in. Nr. Silbury Hill. Ed. Cunnington, from collection of Col. Woodford. W.A.M., xxxv., 400, fig. 15. cf. No. 466. The safety-pin brooches known as the type of "La Tene I." are so-called for their association with the stage of civilisation, represented by the Lake dwelling of that name on the Lake of Neuchatel. In Gaul these brooches abound in the cemeteries of the Marne, dating from circa 350 to 200 B.C. In Britain they may be as early as 250 or 200 B.C., and are therefore of the Early Iron or Late Celtic period preceding the Roman Invasion. They are not found associated with Roman remains. Some 27 examples in all have...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236617738
  • 9781236617736