The Case of the Royal Martyr Considered with Candour; Or, an Answer to Some Libels Lately Published in Prejudice to the Memory of That Unfortunate Prince in Two Volumes.

The Case of the Royal Martyr Considered with Candour; Or, an Answer to Some Libels Lately Published in Prejudice to the Memory of That Unfortunate Prince in Two Volumes.

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1758 edition. Excerpt: ...which the King knew nothing of, and which he publicly and solemnly disclaimed, can the King be properly faid to have signed such Letters and Warrants? Base Insinuation! and evidently calculated to mislead theuntbinging Multitude, and asperse the Memory of an unfortunate and injured Prince. It is not unpleafant to observe, what artful Pains the Enquirer hath taken to interpret, in Prejudice to the King, a Passage in the Nuncio's Memoirs, relating to the blank Sheets, &c. intrusted with Glamorgan. The Passage may be seen in the marginal Note below. The Nuncio informed Pope Innocent X. that Lord Glamorgan's whole Authority, consisting of Blank Sheets and Concessions, signed and sealed with the King's Chamber and private Seal, his Majesty could not, according to Law, be bound De quo flupeo, quod ipsi singulariter intimus reeensultlnnocentio X. Nuncius. "Non poterat, inquit, flerni -' fundamentum in foliis albis & conceslionibus sigillo Regis ' cubiculario &, privato signatis, quibus sua Majestas non ' poterat le.gitime obligari." by them. We see here, fays the Enquirer, are mentioned ConceJJions Jigned and sealed with the Kings Chamber Seal, as well as blank Sheets. So that here the Enquirer would insinuate, that that the King intrusted Glamorgan not only with Blank Sheets, but with Concessions signed and sealed with his Chamber Seal. But is there the least Grounds for such an Insinuation? Not the least: Glamorgan himself never pretended to any written Instructions or ConceJJions from the King; and the King solemnly and repeatedly declared, that he never gave him any, as hath been and will be more fully shewn hereafter. The Meaning of the Nuncio's Words is plain and obvious. As the Vanity of Glamorgan would not probably...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 72 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 145g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236616367
  • 9781236616364