Case of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, Before the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Including ... the Charge of Judge Rogers, the Verdict of the Jury, and the Opinion of

Case of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, Before the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Including ... the Charge of Judge Rogers, the Verdict of the Jury, and the Opinion of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...lightly of them, when his whole case may turn on a point of order, and the very lightest of them The plaintiffs in this case exhibited themselves in this lightThey-have placed their sole reliance on the construction ofa rule of order; and this is it: (Rule 30, ) "silent members, unless excused from voting, must be considered as acquiescing with the maj0rity-" Of so slight authority was this rule considered, that DrBemau, when be inducted Dr. Fisher into the office of moderator, gave him instructions to govern himself, not by this and the other rules which had been previously adopted by the General Asifimblfi but by the rules which shouldibe-subsequently adopted, that is. by an ea: postfacto law. This is on the principle, which our oppflnems sometimes find convenient, that these rules are not binding 0n "y Assembly, until re-enacted by themselves. And yet it is only b.'' one of these rules that they can come at all into this court. Bl" am willing in this case to concede that this rule was in existence, and that if they have brought themselves within its application, you must give them a verdict. It then becomes necessary to consider under what circumstances silent members are to be held as acquiescing with the majority. I admit that if the question is fairly put in a deliberative body, and one portion of that body refuses to vote, they are to be considered as acquiescing in the will of the majority of those who did vote. I admit that this is an established rule of parliamentarv law. But in _ this case, was the question put? That is, was it legally put 'l-Was it put in accordance with the usages and requisitions appropriate to the case'! Was it put in an audible voice and in proper terms, and was it...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 324 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 581g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236737180
  • 9781236737182