The Cartulary and Historical Notes of the Cistercian Abbey of Flaxley; Otherwise Called Dene Abbey, in the County of Gloucester ...

The Cartulary and Historical Notes of the Cistercian Abbey of Flaxley; Otherwise Called Dene Abbey, in the County of Gloucester ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ... the "Abbot's room;" but it is much more probable that it was the refectory of the hospitium, or guest's dining hall. It is now sitted up as a library. In early times, that is during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, while the strictness of the Cistercian rule remained in full force, the abbot had no special rooms. He flept in the common dortor with all his monks, and dined with the better class of guests in the refectory of the hospitium. In later times, when Cistercian abbots began to have special apartments set apart for them, the place chosen for the abbot's lodgings seems to have been far away to the east of the monastic buildings. "With the Cistercians, just as with the Benedictines, the infirmary buildings were a very large and important range, including a cloister, large infirmary hall and a chapel. Considerable remains of this range exist at Rievaulx, Fountains, and many other Cistercian abbeys. There seems no doubt that the later abbots occupied part of the infirmary buildings, which are always to the east of the main cloister, and are reached from it by the passage which adjoins the auditorium (fee Plan, Plate No. VI.) "In the present garden there are three sine stone coffin-lids of thirteenth or fourteenth century work; two of them are carved with abbots' croziers. These and a quantity of vaulting shafts are said to have been found at, or near, the spot where they now lie--marked A on the plan--and this is traditionally the site of the Chapter house; which it very well may be. It was the Cistercian custom to bury their abbots in the Chapter house--no one under the rank of a bishop being allowed to be buried in the church. The monks were interred--never in the cloister garth, as some writers have...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236569113
  • 9781236569110