Card Essays, Clay's Decisions, and Card-Table Talk

Card Essays, Clay's Decisions, and Card-Table Talk

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ...is to be subtracted from his hand. It might be argued that declaring a card is equivalent to playing it, and that, therefore, B has not omitted to play to a trick. But, looking at the consequences that might ensue if players were allowed to declare their cards, instead of playing them, I think a person declaring a card and not playing it, does omit to play to a trick within the meaning of Law 69, and that the adversaries have the option of a fresh deal. The Author's decision was objected to by a player for whose opinion he entertained a high regard. Consequently, he submitted the case to Clay, who favoured him with the decision below: --" I quite agree with your decision in this case, viz.: that Y Z have a right to elect whether the deal shall stand or not, and that, if they decide to go on, the king of hearts should be added to the imperfect trick. " It seems that this decision is challenged, and that the objection made to it is thus expressed: --' Either B has omitted to play to the trick or he has not, and it ought to be in the option of the adversaries to decide this. If they decide that B has not omitted to play to the trick, the king of hearts is to be added to the trick to which it belongs, and no further penalty remains, On the other hand, if the adversaries decide that B has omitted to play to the trick, they can call a fresh deal. If they elect to stand the deal, then B must play out the hand with a surplus card, the card at the end belonging to the imperfect trick, as enacted in Law 69.' The objection is ingenious, but fails to convince me. Law 69 contemplated that which would almost invariably be the case in such an error as this, namely, that it would not be found out until the end of the hand. But as, in this instance, the error is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123666888X
  • 9781236668882