The Capitals of the Globe; The Political, Commercial, Artistic and Sacred Capitals of Europe, Asia, Africa, North America, South America and the West Indies with Graphic and Accurate Descriptions of All Their Wonders, Shrines, Traditions,

The Capitals of the Globe; The Political, Commercial, Artistic and Sacred Capitals of Europe, Asia, Africa, North America, South America and the West Indies with Graphic and Accurate Descriptions of All Their Wonders, Shrines, Traditions,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1893 edition. Excerpt: ... Charles IV. on the model of that of Paris, in 1348. The existing edifice dates from 1718. The fame of the teachers of the university, and the privileges granted to scholars, soon attracted hither students from all parts of Europe, who were divided into four nations: the Bohemians, including Moravians and Hungarians; the Bavarians, or Austrians, Franconians, and Swabians; the Poles and Russians; and the Saxons, including Danes and Swedes. A measure, proposed in 1409, by John Huss, for abridging the privileges of the foreigners and transferring the preponderance from them to the Bohemians, occasioned the secession in one week of fifteen thousand students, who dispersed themselves over Europe, and became the founders of the universities of Leipzig. Heidelberg, and Cracow. The number of seceders appears almost incredible, but the entire body of students is estimated by writers of the period at twenty thousand. From henceforth the Carolinum became the school of those new opinions in religion promulgated by Huss and Jerome of Prague, which gradually separated the Bohemians from the Catholic Church. Huss himself was rector of the university, and here first taught those doctrines which he derived from the English reformer, Wickliffe. Indeed, a close intercourse was kept up between the two nations at that period. Richard II. was married to a Bohemian princess, "the good queen Anne," sister of Wenceslaus IV. Englishmen studied in the university of Prague: they transplanted into Germany the writings of Wickliffe, and his translation of the Bible. During the Hussite troubles, a period highly unfavorable to learning, the university was repeatedly the scene of bloody strife; but it still maintained an important influence in Bohemia, as the rallying...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 350 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 626g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236576543
  • 9781236576545