Canning and Preserving of Food Products with Bacteriological Technique; A Practical and Scientific Hand Book for Manufacturers of Food Products, Bacteriologists, Chemists, and Students of Food Problems. Also for Processors and Managers of

Canning and Preserving of Food Products with Bacteriological Technique; A Practical and Scientific Hand Book for Manufacturers of Food Products, Bacteriologists, Chemists, and Students of Food Problems. Also for Processors and Managers of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...flavor of such vegetables as corn, peas, string beans, asparagus, cauliflower, lima beans, etc. (when sterilized discontinuously), are very much superior to those of the regular canned goods, which have received 240 or 250 F. The writer has made a number of such experiments and the results are gratifying. Sterilization by electricity, such as a direct current or an alternating current or the X-rays is not reliable, and by the first two certain chemical changes are produced which are undesirable. It was hoped and claimed that the X-rays would accomplish sterilization by causing paralysis of the bacterial cells, but repeated experiments have demonstrated only failures. Sterilization by heat is the only method of value for the canning industry. There are some special products which are preserved by chemicals, but these will no doubt be regulated by pure food laws in such a manner that only a minimum quantity of preservatives will be permitted, or perhaps none. One fact must not be lost sight of, however, and that is that various fruits and vegetables contain within themselves certain acids and salts which make them easy to sterilize by heat; these elements of composition act as antiseptics and in some cases as disinfectants for many of the spore-bearing species of bacteria. It must not, therefore, be inferred that a certain process by heat actually destroys all life, but that all bacteria are prevented from multiplying through the destruction of some (by heat) and the antiseptic power of the juices. This may hold good so long as perfect fruits and vegetables are used and the complete elimination of all foreign matter is observed, but should unsound material be used or adulterations find favor, or should dirt or foreign matter get mixed in with good...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 114 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 218g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236534042
  • 9781236534040