Cannibalism: a Perfectly Natural History
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Cannibalism: a Perfectly Natural History

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"Surprising. Impressive. Cannibalism restores my faith in humanity." --Sy Montgomery, The New York Times Book Review

For centuries scientists have written off cannibalism as a bizarre phenomenon with little biological significance. Its presence in nature was dismissed as a desperate response to starvation or other life-threatening circumstances, and few spent time studying it. A taboo subject in our culture, the behavior was portrayed mostly through horror movies or tabloids sensationalizing the crimes of real-life flesh-eaters. But the true nature of cannibalism--the role it plays in evolution as well as human history--is even more intriguing (and more normal) than the misconceptions we've come to accept as fact.

In Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History, zoologist Bill Schutt sets the record straight, debunking common myths and investigating our new understanding of cannibalism's role in biology, anthropology, and history in the most fascinating account yet written on this complex topic. Schutt takes readers from Arizona's Chiricahua Mountains, where he wades through ponds full of tadpoles devouring their siblings, to the Sierra Nevadas, where he joins researchers who are shedding new light on what happened to the Donner Party--the most infamous episode of cannibalism in American history. He even meets with an expert on the preparation and consumption of human placenta (and, yes, it goes well with Chianti).

Bringing together the latest cutting-edge science, Schutt answers questions such as why some amphibians consume their mother's skin; why certain insects bite the heads off their partners after sex; why, up until the end of the twentieth century, Europeans regularly ate human body parts as medical curatives; and how cannibalism might be linked to the extinction of the Neanderthals. He takes us into the future as well, investigating whether, as climate change causes famine, disease, and overcrowding, we may see more outbreaks of cannibalism in many more species--including our own.

Cannibalism places a perfectly natural occurrence into a vital new context and invites us to explore why it both enthralls and repels us.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 352 pages
  • 139.7 x 140 x 25.4mm | 362.87g
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • Reprint
  • 1616207434
  • 9781616207434
  • 372,674

Review quote

"A fascinating exploration of a normally taboo subject." John de Cuevas, contributing editor, Harvard Magazine

Bill Schutt serves up a deliciously entertaining smorgasbordof scientific reality. He gives us a deeper insight into the way naturereallyworks. Darrin Lunde, Museum Specialist, Smithsonian Institution, and author ofThe Naturalist.

Butterflies do it. So do some toads, birds, and polar bears. Did dinosaurs do it? What about the Neanderthals? And what about us, for that matter? If you're hungry for a fun, absorbing read about which animals eat their own kind and why, read this book. Virginia Morell, New York Times bestselling author of Animal Wise: How We Know Animals Think and Feel

A clear-headed, sometimes humorous, sometimes tragic and always fascinating compendium of one of Western culture s strongest taboos. From the Australian redback spider to the Donner Party, Schutt examines the evolutionary purposes that eating one s own can serve. But he goes beyond scientific explanationto show how deeply cannibalism is woven into our own history and literature. Cat Warren, New York Times bestselling author of What the Dog Knows: Scent, Science, and the Amazing Ways Dogs Perceive the World

Bill Schutt s fascinating and compulsively readable new book will amaze you. Ian Tattersall, Curator Emeritus, American Museum of Natural History, and author of The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack and Other Cautionary Tales from Human Evolution
" A clear-headed, sometimes humorous, sometimes tragic--and always fascinating--compendium of one of Western culture s strongest taboos. From the Australian redback spider to the Donner Party, Schutt examines the evolutionary purposes that eating one s own can serve. But he goes beyond scientific explanation to show how deeply cannibalism is woven into our own history and literature. Cat Warren, New York Times bestselling author of What the Dog Knows: Scent, Science, and the Amazing Ways Dogs Perceive the World

Butterflies do it. So do some toads, birds, and polar bears. Did dinosaurs do it? What about the Neanderthals? And what about us, for that matter? If you're hungry for a fun, absorbing read about which animals eat their own kind and why, read this book. Virginia Morell, New York Times bestselling author of Animal Wise: How We Know Animals Think and Feel

Bill Schutt s fascinating and compulsively readable new book will amaze you. Ian Tattersall, Curator Emeritus, American Museum of Natural History and author of The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack and Other Cautionary Tales from Human Evolution

Bill Schutt serves up a deliciously entertaining smorgasbord of scientific reality. He gives us a deeper insight into the way nature really works. Darrin Lunde, Museum Specialist, Smithsonian Institution, and author of The Naturalist"
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About Bill Schutt

Bill Schutt is a professor of biology at LIU Post and a research associate in residence at the American Museum of Natural History. His first book, Dark Banquet: Blood and the Curious Lives of Blood-Feeding Creatures, was selected as a Best Book of 2008 by Library Journal and Amazon and was chosen for the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers program. Born in New York City and raised on Long Island by parents who encouraged his love for turning over stones and peering under logs, Schutt quickly grew a passion for the natural world, with its enormous wonders and its increasing vulnerability. He received his PhD in zoology from Cornell and has published over two dozen peer-reviewed articles on topics ranging from terrestrial locomotion in vampire bats to the precarious, arboreal copulatory behavior of a marsupial mouse. His research has been featured in Natural History magazine as well as the New York Times, Newsday, the Economist, and Discover magazine. He was recently reelected to the board of directors of the North American Society for Bat Research. Schutt lives on the East End of Long Island with his wife and son.
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Rating details

2,981 ratings
3.86 out of 5 stars
5 23% (680)
4 47% (1,403)
3 25% (749)
2 4% (125)
1 1% (24)
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