A Candid Historical Account of the Hospital for the Reception of Exposed and Deserted Young Children [By J. Hanway]. to Which Is Added a Letter from a Country Gentleman [Entitled] the Genuine Sentiments of an English Country Gentleman

A Candid Historical Account of the Hospital for the Reception of Exposed and Deserted Young Children [By J. Hanway]. to Which Is Added a Letter from a Country Gentleman [Entitled] the Genuine Sentiments of an English Country Gentleman

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1759 edition. Excerpt: ...it by casualty, as the overseers and master of the workhouse of such parish: and as no person is more worthy of respect than a vigilant and humane parish officer, it may be hoped such will never be wanting to execute a duty, which regards the infant poor in London, when they are put on such a footing as shall not cost any thing to the parifli. CHAP. CHAP XI.. vl Proposal to'deceive no infants or ch1ldren, but such as are born within the bills of mortality, or infants found deserted within the bills of mortality, with condition-that a certificate of their baptism be signed by the minister or curate of the parish, attested by one of the overseer5 and the master of the parish workhouse, the same to be brought with the-child to the hospu tal. Also a proposal for nourishing the children during their infant state, and if reclaimed, to rei1irh theni to their1 parents, w1thout any expence. 'The conclus1on. i........, . -....', .'. '. IT is common for men on both sides a question, to talk of ruin and destrutlion, if their own opinion is not followed: I cannot fay I think myself infallible; I believe many others are wiser than myself: but when a man has well examined a subject, and compared it with facts, to be unsteady in it, is to be pusillanimous. The business in general requires a great compass of thought and extensive Jcnowlege; but experience naturally leads us to form our judgment: and necessity dictates to us, that if one plan does not answer, we must attempt another; nor should we desist till we have carried our point. Let us proceed with vigor, at the fame time that we Ihow a strict regard to the duties of humanity. And if hereafter we should be still obliged to M make make any further alterations, as this has happened...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123685599X
  • 9781236855992