Canada and Her Resources; An Essay, to Which, Upon a Reference from the Paris Exhibition Committee of Canada, Was Awarded, by His Excellency Sir Edmund Walter Head, Bart., Governor General of British North America the Second Prize

Canada and Her Resources; An Essay, to Which, Upon a Reference from the Paris Exhibition Committee of Canada, Was Awarded, by His Excellency Sir Edmund Walter Head, Bart., Governor General of British North America the Second Prize

By (author) 

List price: US$14.14

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855 edition. Excerpt: ...Ocean Steamship company," its principal place of business being in Montreal, but a large portion of its stock being held in Upper Canada. Beyond doubt these lines, evincing much enterprize, will contribute very materially to the development of the trade of the Province. THE CANALS OP CANADA. The Welland Canal, by which the Falls of Niagara are avoided, was commenced in an early period of the history of Upper Canada, and forced upon the attention of the public chiefly by the energy and perseverance of the Honorable W. H. Merritt. It is a very important work. Its locks are 150 feet in length of chamber, by a width of 26 J feet, its dimensions being well suited for the class of vessels best adapted to the western lakes, and of which large numbers pass through it, as well of Canadian as American crafts. This canal is 28 miles in length having about 30 cut-stone locks. It surmounts an elevation between lakes Ontario and Erie of 330 feet, while the elevation from tide-water to Lake Ontario, being over 200 feet, is overcome by the St. Lawrence Canals, seven in number, of various lengths from 12 miles to one mile, (but in the aggregate only 41 miles of canal, ) having locks 200 feet in length between the gates, and 45 feet in width, with an excavated trunk, from 100 to 140 feet wide on the water surface, and a depth of ten feet of water. These canals are chiefly used for ascending the stream, as large steamers drawing seven feet of water, with passengers and mails, leave Kingston, at the foot of Lake Ontario, in the morning, and without passing through a single lock, reach the wharf at Montreal the same day before dark. A survey of the rapids is now being proceeded with, with the view of removing some obstructions. The time required for the descent...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236575946
  • 9781236575944