The Campaigns of Napoleon Buonaparte; Embracing the Events of His Unexampled Military Career, from the Siege of Toulon, to the Battle of Waterloo. ALS

The Campaigns of Napoleon Buonaparte; Embracing the Events of His Unexampled Military Career, from the Siege of Toulon, to the Battle of Waterloo. ALS

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ...of the 4th, Madrid surrendered. The Spaniards were disarmed, and the town filled with the French army. Napoleon took up his residence at Chamartin, a country house four miles off. In a few days tranquility seemed completely re-established. The French soldiery observed excellent discipline: the shops were re-opened, and the theatres frequented as usual. Napoleon now exercised all the rights of a conqueror. He issued edicts abolishing the inquisition, all feudal rights, and all particular jurisdictions; regulating the numbe? of monks; increasing at the expense of the monastic establishments, the stipends of the parochial clergy; and proclaiming a general amnesty, with only ten exceptions. He received a deputation of the chief inhabitants, who came to signify their desire to see Joseph among them again. His answer was, that Spain was his own by right of conquest; that he could easily rule it by viceroys; but if they chose to assemble in their churches, priests and people, and swear allegiance to Joseph, he was not indisposed to listen to their request. This was a secondary matter; meantime, the Emperor was making his dispositions for the completion of his conquest.--His plan was to invade Andalusia, Valencia and Galicia, by his lieutenants, and to march in person to Lisbon. Nor was this vast plan beyond his means; for he had at that moment 255,000 men, 50,000 horses and 100 pieces of field artillery, actually ready for immediate service in Spain; while 80,000 men and 100 cannon, besides, were in reserve, all on the south side of the Pyrenees. To oppose this gigantic force there were a few poor defeated corps of Spaniards, widely separated from each other, and flying already before mere detachments; Seville, whose local junta had once more assumed...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 168 pages
  • 188.98 x 246.13 x 9.14mm | 312.98g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123652084X
  • 9781236520845