The Campaign in the Crimea; An Historical Sketch. Illustr. by 40 Plates, from Drawings Taken on the Spot by William Simpson. 2. Series

The Campaign in the Crimea; An Historical Sketch. Illustr. by 40 Plates, from Drawings Taken on the Spot by William Simpson. 2. Series

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ... fire of cannon and musketry with which they were received, actually twice again crowned the heights. But in each case their success ended here; and, when the moment of retreat arrived, this temporary advantage only served to aggravate their loss. Hampered by the dense masses of their own men in the rear, escape became almost anI impossibility--a vast number of prisoners were taken, and the remainder of the assailants, presenting in their slow descent of the heights an easy mark to the French, fell thickly on the banks of the canal and the river, or rolled down into the water, .which soon ran red with blood. By nine o clock the enemy were in full retreat on all points, their dense columns retiring as rapidly as possible-under the protection of the cavalry and artillery, which showed a firm front in the plain until this movement was safely effected. General Pelissier wisely refrained from employing his own and the English cavalry, who were drawn up in the valley behind, in pursuit of the enemy: as, had he done so, these splendid troops would have been exposed to a heavy fire from the Russian field-batteries in position, as well as from those on the Mackenzie heights: and the loss they must have suffered, if so employed, would have clouded the lustre of this most brilliant and decisive day. The reverse sustained by the Russians had been indeed severe. Including the wounded, more than two thousand two hundred prisoners remained in the hands of the French and Sardinians, and the enemy s loss in killed and wounded was estimated in all at from 8,000 to 10,000 men. Compared with this, that of the French and Sardinians was trifling. That of the former amounted to 1,551, of whom 181 were killed, 1,224 wounded, and 146 missing; and the..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236610903
  • 9781236610904