Camp Life of a Confederate Boy, of Bratton's Brigade, Longstreet's Corps, C.S.A; Letters Written by Lieut. Richard Lewis, of Walker's Regiment, to His

Camp Life of a Confederate Boy, of Bratton's Brigade, Longstreet's Corps, C.S.A; Letters Written by Lieut. Richard Lewis, of Walker's Regiment, to His

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ...for everything is so dull I have nothing more to note. Camp Near Chattanooga, Tenn., ) October 15th, 1863. We have never experienced such a crisis in the way of rations since our trip to Yorktown, it being now three days since the men have had a full issue of rations. It is the first time I have ever seen them come down to eating roasted acorns, cracking them on yesterday like hogs, and with as great a relish. One fellow told me he actually saw a fellow picking up grains of corn where the horses had wasted it in.feeding, and washing it for nourishment for himself. The consequence of all this starvation is from the incessant rains we have been frequented with this week, causing all the water courses to become so much swollen as to become impassible, thereby cutting us off completely from our supplies. Last night, though, they constructed a raft, by which means they expect to get something across the creek--looking for it now every moment. If Henry would only turn up about now how much our hearts would be gladdened, for our fare has been unusually scanty since we have been in this army--just as much as a fellow can do to keep himself alive. Tell John to profit by the experience of a brother in the war, and return to his peaceful avocations with a spirit and determination of making amends for past conduct, for he will not know the evil of his rash course until he gets out here, then it will be too late to repent. Feed him on acorns and parched corn awhile, and let him lay three or four nights out in a storm; that is the way he can taste of some of the bitter fruits. I expect General "Rosy's" boys are all stuck in the mud in the low lands around Chattanooga, and half fed and frozen to death; so that will be some consolation to the starving...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236500172
  • 9781236500175