Camera; A Practical Magazine for Photographers Volume 8

Camera; A Practical Magazine for Photographers Volume 8

By (author) 

List price: US$7.57

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...frame from slipping inward. A piece of candle, so arranged as to throw a light on the white paper between the glass and frame, completes the thing. A glance at the sketch should make everything clear.--The Amateur Photographer. name of "Pinakol Salt." "Adurol" and Metol together are said to give a more energetic developer than Quinol-Metol. It is proposed by Lebreton to use a developer containing only Pyro and Sodium Sulphite for overexposed plates; for normal exposures a few drops of Ammonia are added, and for underexposures Acetone. Reiss has used plates which can be developed by 3 per cent, solution of Carbonate of Soda. These plates can be made by immersing an ordinary dry-plate in a solution composed of: Hydroquinone, I part; Acetonesulphitc, 10 parts; water, ioo parts. Homolka finds that bromide papers, exposed to daylight for 15 to 20 seconds, can be developed by immersing for two or three hours in a 0.1 per cent, solution of Gold Chloride made acid with Phosphoric Acid. Mercier has obtained good brown and black tones on printing-out papers by the use of a solution of Potassium Palladium Chloride, Citric Acid and Sodium Chloride. A Temporary Retouching Desk To the amateur who occasionally wants to do a little retouching or "faking" on his negatives, the purchase of a proper retouching desk is an unnecessary expense. I give below particulars of how I rig up a temporary one when I require to do any retouching. The necessary articles consist of a printing frame minus springs, a piece of ground or plain glass, a sheet of white paper and a few pins. Spread the sheet of white paper on the table or a piece of flat board, and drive in two pins nearly as wide apart as the width of the printing frame (just a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 184 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 340g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236955668
  • 9781236955661