The Camden and Amboy Railroad; Address Delivered at Bordentown, N.J., November 12th, 1891, Upon the Completion of the Monument Erected by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company to Mark the First Piece of Track Laid Between New York and

The Camden and Amboy Railroad; Address Delivered at Bordentown, N.J., November 12th, 1891, Upon the Completion of the Monument Erected by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company to Mark the First Piece of Track Laid Between New York and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...ordered hewn wooden cross-ties to be laid temporarily, and the rail to be directly spiked thereto. A number of these ties were laid on the sharpest curves in the cut. They showed such satisfactory properties when the road began to be operated that they were permitted to remain, and the stone blocks already in the track were replaced by wooden ties as rapidly as practicable. Without doubt the piece of track in "deep cut" was the first in the world to be laid according to the present American practice of spiking the rail directly to the cross-tie. The L1ne Opened Between Bordentown And South Amboy. Among the memoranda compiled by Benjamin Fish, published in his memoir, I find the following: ' First cars were put on the Camden and Amboy Railroad September 19, 1832. They were drawn by two horses. They took the directors and a few friends from Bordentown to Hightstown and back. "On December 17, 1832, the first passengers were taken from Bordentown through to South Amboy. Fifty or sixty people went. It was a rainy day. "On January 24, 1833, tne first freight cars were put on the railroad. There were three cars, drawn by one horse each, with six or seven thousand pounds of freight on each car. "Freight came from New York by steamboat to South Amboy. I drove the first car, John Twine drove the second car and Edmund Page the third one. We came to the Sand Hills (near Bordentown) by railroad, there loaded the goods on wagons (it was winter, and the river was frozen over), arriving in Philadelphia by sunrise next morning. The goods left New York at 12 o'clock, noon. This was done by the old firm of Hill, Fish & Abbe." Immediately after the road from Bordentown to South Amboy was completed, and as late as the summer...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236751043
  • 9781236751041