Cacao; A Treatise on the Cultivation and Curing of Cacao (Theobroma Cacao), Botany and Nomenclature of the Same and Hints on the Selection and Management of Estates

Cacao; A Treatise on the Cultivation and Curing of Cacao (Theobroma Cacao), Botany and Nomenclature of the Same and Hints on the Selection and Management of Estates

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...of 72 hours or 3 days, when it is probable that if they had been fermented with the skin on, it would have taken three or four times as long to have secured the same colour to the kernel of the bean and appears to demonstrate what constituent it is that produces the colour. The bean however when thus treated is liable to mould very rapidly, but the break and colour is all that could e desired in a first-class Cacao. It would hardly be practicable to treat Cacao on the same lines in large quantities, neither perhaps would it be desirable, but the experiment adds something to our knowledge of the process which has so long been followed, which proves to be after alt a form of malting without germination, which is perhaps what was meant by my predecessor Mr. Prestoe. The skin or testa of the bean, after having allowed the changes caused by fermentation to happen to the kernel through its membranous texture, appears to be finally useful in preventing the inroads of microscopic fungi or mould which would destroy the interior parts of the bean, the toughened covering acting as an efficient preservative of the interior, once it is properly cured. Mr. Morris in his pamphlet mentions that the heat of fermentation generally used is about 140 Fah. Our second prize essayist gives the temperature most suitable as 110 Fah. in the first stage, raising it by 8 in the second stage. Dr. Chittenden gives 115 to 120 as the requisite temperature, but it is doubtful on what basis or on what experiments these temperatures have been determined, for it is certain that the Thermometer is an instrument not in use on many of the best estates in Trinidad. A thorough set of experiments or even hourly readings of the temperature which obtains in the sweating-house of a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236649869
  • 9781236649867