C.R.A. Being a Digest of Pennsylvania Decisions Embracing All the Reported Cases on the Subjects Contained in the Volume, 1898-1922 Volume 1

C.R.A. Being a Digest of Pennsylvania Decisions Embracing All the Reported Cases on the Subjects Contained in the Volume, 1898-1922 Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...no trade or employment, does not violate this section, but is a lawful exercise of the police power.--Comm. v. Baxter, 23 Pa. C. C. 270 (1899), Searle, P. J.; Comm. v. Leber, 4 Lack. Jur. 298 (1903), Edwards, P. J. And so of an act imposing a penalty for turning on the water of a water company without authority, even as applied to one who turns on the water with what he believes to be a lawful intention. The legislature can declare an act a crime and make it punishable regardless of the intent.--Tyrone Gas A W. Co. v. Burley, 19 Super. Ct. 348 (1902), W. D. Porter, J. An act is not unconstitutional because it provides for a penalty for a certain act to be recovered by civil action and also makes the same act a misdemeanor. This is not punishing the same offence twice; both are parts of one punishment.--Comm. v. Diefenbacher, 14 Super. Ct. 264 (1900), Rice, P. J. An act making it a criminal offence for a man to falsely represent himself to be an attorney-atlaw is within the scope of the legislative power and does not violate any provisions of the constitution.--Comm. v. Branthoover, 24 Pa. C. C. 353 (1900), McCbnnell, J.; s. c. 48 Pitts. L. J. 267. An act regulating the business of undertaking so as to require those engaging in it to have proper knowledge and skill is a proper exercise of the police power.--Comm. v. Hanley, 15 Super. Ct. 271 (1900), Rice, P. J. An act forbidding a constable serving as a salaried policeman from accepting constable's fees, and providing a penalty for violation of its provisions, is clearly within the power of the legislature to regulate the police powers of the commonwealth, and it not being shown that it violates any plain stipulation or requirement of the constitution it must be upheld.--McKinney v. York...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 42mm | 1,465g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123690463X
  • 9781236904638