Burmah, Siam, &C

Burmah, Siam, &C

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1830 edition. Excerpt: ... miles distant from Martaban. On the 4th, the army collected, and marched through the town of Martaban, which is more than a mile in length. Next day, Mr. Carey ascended one of the highest mountains, to take a view of the country, which he thus describes: ' The prospects were truly grand and magnificent. To the N. and S., the range of mountains upon which the town is situated, were to be seen as far as the eye could reach. To the E., the long and high range of mountains which separate the Birman dominions from those of Siam, run in a parallel line 'with those which skirt the sea-shore, at about the distance of 100 or 150 miles. To the W., was to be seen the river (the Thaluan), divided into two branches, and opening into the sea, with vast numbers of high islands scattered in different directions. The town appears to be well peopled, as does the surrounding country. The population consists of Peguans, Birmans, Siamese, and mountaineers. The town is situated on the E. side of the mountain, and a stockade runs along the top and the bottom of it j but it is now in a State of decay.'" In Vincent Leblanc's Travels, before referred to, we have the following brief account of Martaban: "From Siam, we came to the kingdom and town of Martaban, sometime subject to Pegu, but since to Siam. There is plenty of rice and other sorts of grain; mines of metals, rubies, and other stones; and the air is very wholesome. The capital town is Martaban, 16 N. (the true latitude is 16 2ff N.) It hath out of their mouths. They acknowledge no government, and live "entirely on what these forests yield, together with the rice, betel, (fee. which they raise, a bare sufficiency for the year's consumption. Aslat. Journal, vol. %%. p. 267. a good harbour, situate...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236496809
  • 9781236496805