A Bulletin on the Proper Preparation of the Seed-Bed with Numerous Quotations from the Highest Authorities on the Subject and Relating the Experiences of Practical Farmers; Issued March 1, 1912. Re-Issued May 1, 1912. Re-Issued Jan. 1, 1913

A Bulletin on the Proper Preparation of the Seed-Bed with Numerous Quotations from the Highest Authorities on the Subject and Relating the Experiences of Practical Farmers; Issued March 1, 1912. Re-Issued May 1, 1912. Re-Issued Jan. 1, 1913

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ... be mentioned. There may be excess of moisture for a part of the season, then comes a dry time when the plants suffer, it is at a critical time too. Corn suffers for moisture when it is earing or filling. Potatoes suffer as the tubers swell. Cotton suflers as the bolls set and ripen. No doubt there has been moisture enough early in the season, but it is not held. Deeply-plowed and well-pulverized soil retains moisture very much better than hard soil. It holds more moisture to begin with and it is much more slowly evaporated. So there is dual advantage from deep plowing, the rendering available of much more plant food and the use of much more moisture. Mr. W. J. Spillman, agriculturist in charge of farm management investigations, U. S. Department of Agriculture, in Farmers' Bulletin No. 245, says: "In order to produce a ton of hay it is necessary that the growing grass pump up approximately 500 tons of water. In order to supply this enormous quantity of water, the soil must not only be in condition to absorb and hold water well, but must be porous enough to permit water to flow freely through it." WHAT IS CAPILLARY ACTION?--THE PRINCIPLE Capillary action is the height to which water will rise in fine tubes or between closely placed surfaces. The finer the bore of the tube, or the closer the particles of matter to each other the higher the water will rise--and having risen--will he more certainly and perfectly be held at its greatest height above the ordinary water level. In a glass tube, say a sixteenth of an inch in diameter, the water within the tube will rise possibly half an inch above the water level in the cup. Reduce the tube or the size of interstices between grains of fine sand or soil to a point where it...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123679155X
  • 9781236791559