Bulletin [Of Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station] - New York (State). Agricultural Experiment Station, Ithaca Volume 1-15

Bulletin [Of Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station] - New York (State). Agricultural Experiment Station, Ithaca Volume 1-15

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...19. Seeds of different species may vary in sprouting in reference to weight. 20. The color of the seed in some cases is a tolerably accurate measure of rapidity and per cent. of sprouting. 21. When there is any variation in viability in reference to color, it is usually found that the stronger sproutings occur in the darker colored seeds. 22. The relative values of seeds of different colors vary with each species, or sometimes with each sample. 23. The latitude in which seeds are grown may determine their behavior in germination. 24. Northern grown corn appears to germinate quicker than southern grown corn. It is to be expected, from our knowledge of the variation of plants in reference to latitude, that seeds of most species will give similar results. 25. Variation in results of seed-tests may be due to the apparatus in which test is made. 26. Those apparatuses in which the seeds are exposed to light are to be distrusted. 27. Those apparatuses which afford no protection to the seeds other than a simple layer of cloth, paper, board, or similar cover, are usually unsafe, from the fact that they allow of too great extremes in amounts of moisture. (Cf. Tables 2, 3, and 41.) 28. The so-called Geneva tester appears to give better results of sprouting than tests made in soil, probably from the fact that moisture and temperature are less variable than in the soil tests. 29. In order to study germination to its completion, tests must be made in soil. 30. Tests made in-doors are more reliable than those made in the field. II. Results commonly vary between tests made under apparently identical conditions, even with selected seeds. Therefore, 31. One test cannot be accepted as a true measure of any sample of seeds. III. The results of actual...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123687353X
  • 9781236873538