Bulletin of the Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of Tennessee, State Agricultural and Mechanical College Volume 59-82

Bulletin of the Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of Tennessee, State Agricultural and Mechanical College Volume 59-82

List price: US$13.48

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ...for grass which can be utilized at any and all seasons of the year. It also does away with the necessity for elaborate and costly farm buildings; for the food off ten acres of land can be stored in a 100or 125-ton silo occupying a few feet of ground, whereas, to handle the same crop in the form of roughness would require an expensive barn. It is very much cheaper for the farmer to build silos for the protection of his food than the large structures required to handle his hay and stover. These are not all the advantages of the silo but they are enough to be suggestive of its wide utility. CROPS FOR THE SILO A great variety of crops can be utilized for the silo. Corn is generally placed first, and in many respects it is still the leading crop. Possibly it is the best adapted for general use, taking the country as a whole, but for the South it has a rival in sorghum. Two kinds of corn may be utilized for silage; the large, coarse varieties, requiring a long time to mature, and the smaller and earlier maturing varieties. The larger varieties should be planted early, from April 1 to 15. The smaller varieties may be planted as a second crop, since they require only from 90 to 100 days to mature. Corn forms the best kind of silage for dairy cows because it does not affect the flavor of the milk and butter as sorghum sometimes does. The yields of corn are not so large as those obtained from sorghum, and general observation leads to the belief that, with the exception noted above, sorghum is practically as valuable for dairy cows and beef cattle as corn. Then, it gives much larger yields and is more resistant to drought while just as easy to cultivate and handle as corn. There is a general belief that sorghum produces a sour silage and is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 192 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 354g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236980956
  • 9781236980953