Bulletin of the Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of Tennessee, State Agricultural and Mechanical College Volume 32-58

Bulletin of the Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of Tennessee, State Agricultural and Mechanical College Volume 32-58

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...of the peanuts make fi per cent, by weight and that 40 per cent, of oil may be extracted from the kernels, there should be obtained 8.65 pounds of oil from each bushel of twenty-three pounds. This would give in liquid measure 1.15 gallons, which at the price of $1 per gallon, would make $1.15 for the oil extracted from one bushel of peanuts. Manufacturers use this oil as a substitute for olive oil in fulling cloth. A large amount is used in the manufacture of soap. It is not very desirable as a lighting fluid, as it does not give as clear light as whale oil or petroleum. For the fattening of hogs peanuts are exceedingly valuable, and have proved very satisfactory on account of their large content of fatty matter. Hogs are very fond of them. THE VINE AS A FORAGE CROP--The haulm or vine, when carefully harvested, before it has been injured by frost, is an excellent food for cattle and sheep. Horses are exceedingly fond of it, but the amount of dirt which necessarily adheres to it is apt to produce a disagreeable cough. The red peanut makes better hay than the white, because it grows erect, and is, therefore, freer from dirt. Usually about one ton is saved per acre, though upon strong land, where the vines grow luxuriantly, two or more tons have been saved. Many practical farmers prefer this hay to clover hay. Like clover hay it must be handled carefully, or the leaves will fall off, leaving nothing but the stems, that are practically worthless. It produces a copious flow of rich, creamy-milk when fed to milch cows. Ewes in lambing time can have no better food given them than well-cured peanut hay, because it increases the flow of milk and enriches its quality. JAPAN CLOVER--BUSH CLOVER--KING GRASS--(Lespedeza striata)--(Grazing and Hay.)...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 274 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 494g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236751329
  • 9781236751324