Bulletin Volume 2

Bulletin Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ... differences in temperature, though not a sufficient one, is the warming of the air by compression and its cooling by expansion incident to barometric changes. A discussion of this phenomenon is given in Hann 's Lehrbuch der Meteorologie, page 589, where it is shown that, when the temperature of dry air is 0 C., in which is the pressure, expressed in millimeters of mercury, and dt the change in degrees centigrade. According to figures 4 and 5 the temperature, both winter and summer, at the altitude of 4 kilometers, is, roughly, 7 C. warmer in the region of an average high barometer than it is in that of a low. But to secure this temperature difference as a result of pressure change only would require a rise or fall of the barometer at this level of about 40 mm., or something like 70 mm. at sea level. Therefore, since this is fully three times the average range of pressure, it is clear that the observed temperature changes can not in the main be accounted for in this way, though of course the pressure effect must be present to some extent. Besides, it is not clear how a compression in the lower atmosphere suiiicient to produce the observed difference in temperature could at the same time cause, or be accompanied by, a rarefaction in the isothermal region sufficient to secure the lower temperatures that prevail there when the_barometer ishigh. ' Another source of temperature changes, generally associated with the height of the barometer, is the clear and the cloudy condition of the sky, or the humid and the dry state of the atmosphere. A barometric high, as We know, commonly is accompanied by clear skies and a dry atmosphere, while in the region of a low the sky ordinarily isovercast, the atmosphere relatively moist, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236851137
  • 9781236851130