Bryant & Stratton's Commercial Law for Business Men; Including Merchants, Farmers, Mechanics, Etc., and Book of Reference for the Legal Profession, Adapted to All the States of the Union

Bryant & Stratton's Commercial Law for Business Men; Including Merchants, Farmers, Mechanics, Etc., and Book of Reference for the Legal Profession, Adapted to All the States of the Union : To Be Used as a Text-Book for Law Schools and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1865 edition. Excerpt: ...exclusive possession of it, and they are stolen, the innkeeper is not responsible. Farnworth v. Packwood, 1 Stark. 249. Or if, LIABILITY or INNKEEPER. _ 261 instead of confiding the goods to an innkeeper, he commits them exclusively to the custody of another person who is living at the inn; the innkeeper is _not liable in case of loss. Sneider v. Geiss, 1 Yeates, 34. 485. The extent of the innkeeper's responsibility for the goods of his guest is not yet entirely settled. He is not liable for trespasses committed upon the person of the guest, and was formerly held exonerated from losses occasioned by inevitable casualty, or by superior force, as by robbery. But the policy of the law has been steadily holding to a stricter degree of responsibility, until at the present time they are placed substantially upon the footing of common carriers, and held to be insurers of the goods of their guests except in case of loss by the act of God, and the public enemy. Richmond v. Smith, 8 Barn. (fr Cress. 9 Mason v. Thompson, 9 Pick. 280. The authority of this last case, however, is overruled in G1-innel v. Ooolr, 3.Hz'll, 485, so far as it holds the iimkeeper responsible for the goods of 'a person who was not at the inn, and not, therefore, a guest. The character of guests must always be first established before the innkeeper can be held responsible for his property., 486. Another point of interest and difiiculty has arisen, and that is to determine what character of goods this extraordinary extent of liability shall attach to. Shall it be limited simply to the baggage a traveller ordinarily carries with him, or shall it embrace all goods he may have in his custody? There is a conflict in the cases upon" this point. The Berkshire...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 178 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236939441
  • 9781236939449