The Brontes; Life and Letters. Being an Attempt to Present a Full and Final Record of the Lives of the Three Sisters, Charlotte, Emily and Anne Bronte

The Brontes; Life and Letters. Being an Attempt to Present a Full and Final Record of the Lives of the Three Sisters, Charlotte, Emily and Anne Bronte

By (author) 

List price: US$20.47

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...with an eminent countryman of yours, Sir David Brewster, and hearing, in his friendly Scotch accent, his lucid explanation of many things that have been to me before a sealed book, I began a little better to comprehend it, or at least a small part of it; whether its final results will equal expectation I know not. C. BRONTfi. CHAPTER XXVII LONELY HOURS From March to October 1852--the months in which Villette was being written, with long intervals of rest of a kind--were among the saddest of Charlotte Bronte's life. She seemed to suffer from a reaction from all the visiting of the previous year. She saw few people, and only varied the quiet, monotonous life of Haworth by a lonely journey to her sister Anne's grave at Scarborough. The letters written during these months call for but little comment. One is struck, however, by the absence of correspondence with her literary friends. The world takes little count to-day of the writer who drops out of its ken for a year or two, and it must have been even so half a century back. Three years separated the publication of Shirley from the publication of Villette, and although the success of Jane Eyre and Shirley had been great, it is clear that the writer of these books could no longer be of importance to the London lionhunters, even had she desired it. As it was, she led a life of painful isolation that must seem extraordinary to the average successful novelist of our time. One marked fact that these letters reveal is that Mr. James Taylor had caught a firmer hold on her mind and heart than she had been conscious of hitherto, and that, had the 'little man, ' as she so frequently termed him, come hastily over from Bombay, he might most certainly have won for his wife one of the most distinguished authors of..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 182 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 336g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236676343
  • 9781236676344