Broken Fetters; The Light of Ages on Intoxication. a Historical View of the Drinking Habits of Mankind, from the Earliest Times to the Present. Especially Devoted to the Various Temperance Reform Movements in the United States

Broken Fetters; The Light of Ages on Intoxication. a Historical View of the Drinking Habits of Mankind, from the Earliest Times to the Present. Especially Devoted to the Various Temperance Reform Movements in the United States

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...for the country's welfare and morality than all the income which could be realized from so pernicious a drink." As we have described in the last chapter, local prohibition of the liquor traflic has been maintained in many parishes of Sweden during the past thirty years. Interesting prohibitory movements have also been made in Great Britain and Ireland, an account of which must be left until after we have told the story of restrictive efforts in America. Edicts of a partially or fully prohibitory character were passed from time to time (luring the early colonial history of this country... Thus, the commission for the government of Newfoundland, issued in 1630, positively forbade the sale of liquor of any kind to the fishermen, and even tobacco was prohibited. In 1637 the General Court of l'Iassaclmsetts forbade the sale, by keepers of ordinaries, of "either sack or strong water." A more stringent measure was introduced in 1676 into the constitution of Virginia, in which "the sale of wines and ardent spirits was absolutely prohibited throughout the whole country, with an exception in favor of Jamestown. The indications of history are that these efforts were not very successful in checking the traflic. The prohibitory movement of the present century within the United States began with the refusal to grant licenses in certain localities. The earliest case on record is that of the town of Harwich, Mass., where in 1829 the selectmen were instructed not to grant licenses. This law was not enforced without difliculty, but by vigorous prosecution the liquorsellers were driven from the town. The example here given was quickly followed elsewhere. Other towns in Massachusetts, as well as several cities and towns in all...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236991877
  • 9781236991874