British Theatre; Consisting of the Most Esteemed English Plays Volume 8

British Theatre; Consisting of the Most Esteemed English Plays Volume 8

By (author) 

List price: US$20.11

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1780 edition. Excerpt: ...uneasy, and ' L. Bet. Poor creature! her pride indeed makes her carry it off, without taking any notice of it to 'me; though I know she hates me in her heart, and 'I can't endure malicious people, so I us'd to dine 'with her once a week, purely to give her disorder; 'if you had but seen when my lord and I fool'd a little, the creature Iook'd so ugly.' L. Easy. But I should not think my reputation fase; my Lord Foppington's a man that talks often of his amours, but seldom speaks of favours that are resus'd him. L. Bet. Pshah; will any thing a man fays make a woman less agreeable? Will his talking spoil one's complexion, or put one hair out of order? and for reputation, look you, my dear, take it for a rule, that as, amongst the lower rank of people, no woman wants beauty that has fortune; so, amongst people of fortune, no woman wants virtue that has beauty; but an estate and beauty join'd are of an unlimited, nay, a power pontisical, make one not only absolute, but infallible--A sine woman's never in the wrong; if we were, 'tis not the strength of a poor creature's reason that can unsetter him O! how I love to hear hear a wretch curse himself for loving on, or now and then coming out with a "Yet for the plague of human race, "This devil has an angel-s face." L. Easy. At this rate, I don't see you allow reputation to be at all essential to a sine woman. L. Bet. Just as much as honour to a great man t power always is above scandal. 'Don't you hear peo'pie fay, the king of France owes most of his con'quests to breaking his word? and wou'd not the consederates have a sine time on't, if they were on ly to go to war with reproaches r' Indeed, my dear, that jewel reputation is a very fancisul business; one shall not see an homely creature...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236638913
  • 9781236638915