British Popular Customs, Present and Past, Illustrating the Social and Domestic Manners of the People; Arranged According to the Calendar of the Year

British Popular Customs, Present and Past, Illustrating the Social and Domestic Manners of the People; Arranged According to the Calendar of the Year

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...former times.--Holloway, Hist. of Rye, 1847, p. 608. At a village called Temple-Sowerby it is customary for a number of persons to assemble together on the green, and there propose a certain number as candidates for contesting the various prizes then produced, which consist of a grindstone as the head prize; a hone, or whetstoue for a razor, as the second; and whetstones of an inferior description for' those who can only reach a state of mediocrity in "the noble art of lying 1" The people are the judges. Each candidate in rotation commences a story such as his fertile genius at the moment prompts, and the more marvellous and improbable his story happens to be, so much the greater chance is there of his success. After being amused in this manner for a considerable length of time, and awarding the prizes to the most deserving, the host of candidates, judges, and other attendants adjourn to the inns, where the sports of the day very often end in a few splendid battles.--Every Day Book, vol. ii. p. 599. In this county it is the practice, every May-morning, to make folks May-goslings, a practice similar to that on the first of April. This custom prevails till twelve o'clock at noon, after which time none carry on the sport. On this day, too, ploughmen and others decorate themselves with garlands and flowers, and parade through different towns for their annual collection, which they spend in the evening with their sweethearts at the maypole.--Time's Telescope, 1829, p. 176. The dance round the Maypole is kept up, says Cuthbert Bede (N. rf Q. lst S. vol. x. p. 92), at the village of Clent, near Hagley. WALES. About a fortnight previous to May-day the question among the lads and lasses is, " Who will turn out to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 174 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 322g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236748131
  • 9781236748133