British Orchids; Containing an Exhaustive Description of Each Species and Variety, to Which Are Added Chapters on Structure and Other Peculiarities, Cultivation, Fertilisation, Classification, and Distribution

British Orchids; Containing an Exhaustive Description of Each Species and Variety, to Which Are Added Chapters on Structure and Other Peculiarities, Cultivation, Fertilisation, Classification, and Distribution

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...lanceolate leaves at the base, the upper portion being thickly beset with long linear bracts. Leaves at the base 2 J inches long by 1 inch broad, stem clasping, and usually spotted. Flower-spike large in proportion to the plant's size, 2 to 3 inches in length, usually dense and conical in shape, and varying in colour from a bright pinky-purple to nearly white. Sepals equal in size, also the same length but not so broad as the two inner petals, none of these surpassing the lip in length. Two outer sepals always the same colour and marked like the lip. Two petals and upper sepal forming a hood-like protection to the column. Lip wide in proportion to the flower's size, three-parted, the middle lobe small, angular, and hardly an eighth-part the size of the lip, the whole marked with lines and spots. Spur horizontal with the ovary, the same length or shorter, cylindrical, and pointed at the apex. Bracts linear, acute, and exceeding the flowers in length. Pollinia, after becoming attached to an object, diverge slightly, and afterwards go through the same act of depression as in 0. mascula. The above is an accurate description of a sweet little native Orchid that I have frequently found growing in quantity on elevated marshes and mountain meadows, and which is not described in any work on the British Flora. That it should have escaped notice so long is, however, not to be wondered at when we consider the conflicting opinions of botanists regarding the two nearly-allied, though perfectly distinct, species 0. maculata and 0. latifolia; and as it is not at all unlikely that the plant in question may be confounded with the former (0. maculata), the following wide differences between these two may be pointed out: --(1) The great difference in size. In a small...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236556364
  • 9781236556363