British Naval Achievements; Being an Accurate Account of the Lives and Actions of British Seaman from 1780 to the Last Expedition Against Algiers in 1816

British Naval Achievements; Being an Accurate Account of the Lives and Actions of British Seaman from 1780 to the Last Expedition Against Algiers in 1816 : Forming an Uninterrupted Succession of Gallant Exploits on That Element, in Our

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823 edition. Excerpt: ...as before stated, employed with their brothers, under the direction of their common father Adams, in the culture of the ground, which produced cocoa nuts, bananas, the bread-fruit tree, yams, sweet potatoes, and turnips. They have also plenty of hogs and goats; the woods abound with a species of wild hog, and the coast of the island with several kinds of good fish. " Their agricultural implements are made by themselves from the iron supplied by the Bounty, which with great labour they beat out into spades, hatchets, crows, &c. This was not all. The good old man kept a regular journal in which was entered the nature and quantity of work performed by each family, what each had received, and what was due on account. There were, it seems, besides private property, a sort of general stock out of which articles were issued on account to the several members of the community; and for mutual accommodation exchanges of one kind of provision for another were very frequent, as salt for fresh provisions, vegetables and fruit for poultry, fish, &c. also when the stores of one family were low or wholly expended, a fresh supply was raised from ano-ther, or out of the general stock, to be repaid when cir cumstances were more favourable; all of which was carefully noted down in John Adams's Journal. " But what was most gratifying of all to the visitors was the simple and unaffected manner in which they returned thanks to the Almighty for the many blessings they enjoyed. They never failed to say grace before and after meals, to pray every morning at sun-rise, and they frequently repeated the Lord's Prayer and the Creed. ' It was truly pleasing, ' says Captain Pipon, ' to see these poor people so. well...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 170 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 313g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123696747X
  • 9781236967473
  • 2,258,920