British and Native Cochin

British and Native Cochin

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...such have been the unsightly Fruit partly of regal tyranny, but more especially of the destruction of conscience by heathenism. The above causes very naturally stimulated the 84 REVENGE. worst passions of man. A relations well, -being, a. neighbours reputation beco.nes a matter of envy to even a rich and honoured man, towards the former injustice is often shewn in the settlement of an inheritance, and against the latter false charges are made to ruin his character. The native courts afford too much facility for one man to llljlIl'8 another by expensive law-suits; and the system of appealing against a judgment on a frivolous matter from place to place enables the rich man to distress a poorer one without any appearance of bad feelinoy Cases have been known where a man has accused a neighbour of murder when the body of a suicide had been found, and until British influence overspread the country it sometimes ran hard against the defendant. In Ceylon some fifty years ago a most singular instance of such a malicious spirit; occurred. A man who had for some reason imbibed a strong feeling of enmity against a, neighbour endeavoured by imagin-try charges to ruin his character and estate, but found English judges would not tolerate such p"o: eedings nor accept golden spectacles to view them; so as a last resource. he went down to the sea beach and deliberately committed suicide under the impression that even British justice would be compelled to judge the neighbour (who was known to possess bad feelin s towards him) guilty of his murder. But happily an alibi was established immediatily the suspicion was aroused, and so the poor deluded Cingalese made a very useless sacrifice of himself. '1'hough for other objects most parsimonious the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236907868
  • 9781236907868