British Guiana-Venezuela Boundary; Arbitration Between the Governments of Her Britannic Majesty and the United States of Venezuela. Proceedings. 1st-[55] Days [Jan. 25-Oct. 6, 1899] Volume 7-8

British Guiana-Venezuela Boundary; Arbitration Between the Governments of Her Britannic Majesty and the United States of Venezuela. Proceedings. 1st-[55] Days [Jan. 25-Oct. 6, 1899] Volume 7-8

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ...a very large claim was being made, much larger than what was included in what has been called PalmerstonSchomburgk map: equally so when Lord Granville's letter comes. Is there anything in the correspondence which shows that the Venezuelan Minister then said that this is something quite different from what we were negotiating in 1850 or agreed upon then? Mr Soley.--Well, I am notprepared to answer that question, because I could not answer it without looking through the correspondence with reference to that particular fact. But I think it is important, because what strikes me. and has struck me, as I think I have said before, is that Venezuela does not appear to have attributed the least importance to the Palmerston-Schomburgk sketch or to have in any way, before or after, intimated that its position was taken up and acted upon by reason of the representations in that so called Palmerston-Schomburgk sketch. I would suggest here, my Lord, in reference to that, and I think the point is an important one, and I think it is well that it has been raised. that the facts which occurred prior to the Agreement of 1850 were facts that were from 35 to 40 years old. And that Venezuela--while, of course I do not know that that would wholly justify the absence of a necessary communication, although I do not think that any communication or comment was necessary in reference to this matter--Venezuela was largely in a state of revolution and that there were constant changes there of administration. The consequence is that it would not be unnatural that the facts, the historical facts they are, which preceded the Agreement of 1850 should be lost sight of. In fact, they were lost sight of, they were lost sight of even by the authorities ofGreat Britain....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 368 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 658g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236824342
  • 9781236824349