British Foreign Policy After Brexit
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British Foreign Policy After Brexit

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Description

British Foreign Policy after Brexit by David Owen and David Ludlow is, perhaps surprisingly, a book written by two people from different generations who voted on opposite sides in the 2016 referendum. One a politician, the other a former diplomat, they both have significant business experience in world markets. The authors demonstrate how Britain's global role and influence can be enhanced rather than diminished post-Brexit, with a diplomatic, security, development and trade agenda based on hard-headed realism, including a review of budgetary priorities. As a firmly European country, they see the UK as a key player with Germany and France in the wider Europe, and a leader in security issues threatening the continent's stability. They do not regard the relationship with Moscow as inevitably confrontational, but believe strengthening NATO is essential and a top priority to contain Russia. In the wider world, a reinvigorated UK-US relationship will be critical, but must accommodate differences in some core areas, e.g. in dealing with China.Furthermore, they see the UK's new aircraft carrier at the heart of a UN Rapid Reaction Force drawn mainly from Commonwealth countries, including Australia, Canada, India and New Zealand, and supporting operations around the globe.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 356 pages
  • 135 x 216 x 28mm | 344g
  • Biteback Publishing
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1785902342
  • 9781785902345
  • 1,002,732

About David Ludlow

David Owen was a Labour MP for twenty-six years from 1966-92, serving as Navy Minister, Health Minister and Foreign Secretary in several governments. He was co-founder of the Social Democratic Party, and its Leader from 1983-90.;David Ludlow's career has spanned both the public and private sectors. After stints in the British Embassy in Moscow at the end of the Gorbachev era, he spent two years working with David Owen at the International Conference on the Former Yugoslavia.show more