The British Encyclopedia, or Dictionary of Arts and Sciences; Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge

The British Encyclopedia, or Dictionary of Arts and Sciences; Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge : Illustrated with Upwards of 150 Elegant Engravings. I - N Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1809 edition. Excerpt: ...emblems; but the former inscribed their names. It is entirely useless to particularize the deities and their insignia; but in order to facilitate the study of medals, it may be proper to mention some of the symbols which are not commonly known; branches of plants issuing from vases, for instance, imply a reference to religious games; the serpent springing from a colfer denotes the mystic rites of Bacchus; the anchor on medals infers that they are Seleucian, and struck at Antioch; the tripod was placed, by the Syrian princes, covered and uncovered under the figures of their deities; to which may be added others, in the words of Mr. Pinkerton: " the flowers of pomegranates, for Rhodes; owl, for Athens; pegasus, for Corinth; wolf 's head, for Argos; bull's head, for Bteotia; minotaur's head, and the labyrinth, for Crete," 610. &c. Were we to pursue this part of the subject, it would lead to an incredible length of investigation, and it may be doubted whether many mistakes might not be created through the obvious obscurity involving it. The legends on coins and medals are of too much importance to require a recommendation of their study; the earliest coins the centre of the medal they are called the. inscription; and when they are separated from the figure by a line near the bottom, they are on the exergue. The varieties and abundance of legends, &c. precludes a possibility of entering into their merits and peculiarities; some being merely explanatory, cannot be subject either to censure or criticism; others impute virtues, and convey compliments well deserved; but it may justly be doubted, whether the majority do not speak 'every language except that of truth. One specimen may serve to convince the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 458 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 24mm | 812g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236819101
  • 9781236819109