The British Encyclopedia, or Dictionary of Arts and Sciences Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge Volume 2

The British Encyclopedia, or Dictionary of Arts and Sciences Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1809 edition. Excerpt: ...classes consisting merely of tubercular eminences. In the lower orders the brain seems to be really wanting. A nervous chord runs along the body, and possesses ganglia at different distances, from which the nerves arise. In insects and vermes the upper ganglion of tlie ocrvou chord, which represents the brain, is plawl near the mouth, or oesophagus, and very generally surrounds that tube by a kind el collar. ORGANS OP SENSE. Few subjects in comparative anatomy and physiology have given rise to more various and contradictory opinions than the organs of sense in some classes of animals. Much misunderstanding on this point has clearly arisen from the inconsiderate and unconditional application of inferences drawn from the human subject to animals. Thus it has been supposed, that those which possess a tongue must have it for the purpose of tasting, and that the sense of smell mast be wanting where we are unable to ascertain the existence of a nose. Observation and reflection will soon convince us, that the tongue, in many cases (in the anteaters among the mammalia, and almost universally iu birds), cannot from its substance and mechanism be considered as an organ of taste; but must be merely subservient to the ingestion and deglutition of the food. Again, in several animals, particularly among insects, an acute sense of smell seems to exist, although no part can be pointed -ot in the head which analogy would justify uin describing as a nose. However universally animals may possess tint feeling which makes them sensible to toe impressions of warmth and cold, very few possess, like the human subject, organs exclusively appropriated to the sense of tench, and expressly constructed for the purpose of feeling, examining, and exploring tie qualities of..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 486 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 25mm | 862g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236642163
  • 9781236642165