The British Encyclopedia; Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge Volume 5

The British Encyclopedia; Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1809 edition. Excerpt: ...interests of man. 90. Eighthly, since the concerns of religion and a future'State are of infinitely more importance than those which relate to this work), it should be our most earnest object to contribute, as far as in us lies, to the moral and religious improvement of our fellow-creatures. In various ways we liave this power; and this is a field in which all can, more or less, employ their talents. Here no effort can be altogether thrown away; at least no effort will be prejudicial; and if to others they will be useless, their effects return to our own bosom!. 91. Ninthly, we ought to payjthr strictest regard to truth both in our alfirmatious and promises. There are very few instances where veracity of both kinds is not evidently conducive to the public good, and falsehood in every degree pernicious. It follows, therefore, that, in cases where appearances are otherwise, the general regard to truth, which is of so much consequence to the world, ought t make us adhere inviolably to it; and that it is a most dangerous practice to falsify, as is often done, from false delicacy, or even from those motives which border upon virtue. The harm which these tilings do, by creating a mutual diffidence, and tendency to deceive, is incalculable; and perhaps in no instance to be counterbalanced by the present guod effects assigned as the reason tor their practice. 92. Tenthly, obedience to the civil magistrate, and to the laws of the community, is a subordinate general rule of the greatest importance.--It is evidently for tlie public good tliat every member of a state should submit to the governing power, whatever that be. Peace, order, and harmony result from this in the general; confusion and mischief of all kinds from the contrary. S...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 482 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 25mm | 853g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236979451
  • 9781236979452