The British Encyclopedia; Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge Volume 3

The British Encyclopedia; Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1809 edition. Excerpt: ... general effect is much inferior to that produced in the regular way, and the smallest drop of water falling on the sized part occalions a stain. This kind of gilding ran only be applied on in-tloor work, as rain, and even a considerable degree of dampness, will occasion the gold to peel off. When dirty, it may be cleaned with a soft brush, and hot spirit of wine, or oil of turpentine. It is chiefly used on picture frames, mouldings, and stucco. Letters written on vellum or paper are gilded in three ways: in the first, a little size is mixed with the ink, and the letters are written as usual; when they arc dry, a slight degree of stickiness is produced by breathing on them, upon which the gold leaf is immediately applied, and by a little pressure may be made to adhere with sufficient firmness. In the second method, some white-lead or chalk is ground up with strong size, and the letters arc made with this by means of a brush: when the mixture is almost dry, the gold leaf may be laid on, and afterwards burnished. The last method is, to mix up some gold powder with size, and make the letters of this by means pf a brush. The edges of the leaves of books are gilded, while in the binder's press, byfirst applying a composition formed of four parts of Armenian bole, and one of sugar candy, ground together to a proper consistence, and lnying it on with a brush with the white of egg: this coating, when nearly dry, is smoothed by the burnisher; it is iken slightly moistened with clean water, and the gold leaf applied, and afterwards burnished. In order to impress the gilt figures on the leather covers of books, the leather is first dusted over with very fine rczin, or mastich, then the iron tool by which'the figure is made a moderately heated, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 494 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 25mm | 875g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236974379
  • 9781236974372