The British Encyclopedia; Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge Volume 10

The British Encyclopedia; Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge Volume 10

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1818 edition. Excerpt: ...and succeeded better in a partnership with Fust. The evidence in favour of Guttemberg appearing to us decisive, we shall not enter into any examination of the claims advanced by the other candidates for the honour of being the inventor of the art of letter-press printing. The names of ' hose persons were, John Fust, of Mentz; John Mental of Strasbourg; and L. John ivoster, of Haerlem. When the city of Mentz was taken by Adolphus, Count of Nassau, in 1462, Fust, and SchoefFer, servant and son-in-law to Fust, suffered ma: erially with their fellow-townsmen.--Their associates and workmen dispersed '.o seek theirforiunes, and the art was thus diffused over Europe. When it was first established at Paris, the copiers, finding '.heir business so materially injured, pretented a memorial of complaint to the parlament, and that tribunal, as superstitious ai the people, who took the printers for conjurers, had their books seized and confiscated. Louis XI. who, villain as he was, was the friend and patron of letters, forbide the parliament to take any farther cognizance of the affair, and restored thtir property to the printers. The art of printing now began to spread itself over a great part of Europe with astonishing rapidity. It was practised at Rome in the year 1467, and the year following it was introduced into England by Thomas Bourchier, Archbishop of Canterbury, who sent W. Turner, master of the robes, and W. Caxton, merchant, to the continent to learn the art. Turner ai d Caxton met with one Corseilles, an under-workman, whom they bribed with considerable presents and large promises, to come over to England, -and instruct there in the art. This business having been accomplished, a press was set up at Oxford, which was afterwards removed to St. Albans, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 216 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 395g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236544943
  • 9781236544940