The British Colonies; Their History, Extent, Condition and Resources Volume 8

The British Colonies; Their History, Extent, Condition and Resources Volume 8

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...In an able pamphlet, (published at Kingston, in 1846, Mr. M-Geachy pointe out how much of the diminished production of Jamaica was owing to destructive droughts, by which the peasantry were compelled to attend to their own provision grounds, which they could not neglect, for any wages that it was in the power of the planter to give; and he demonstrated, by figures, that certain sugar estates in Vere, Clarendon, and a few other parishes in the great plains, produced in 1846 only 14,150 tons, whereu, even with the labour then available in the island, they ought to have yielded 48,125 tons. Referring to the " rich and extensive plains (of Liguanea), exceeding 154,000 acres of mostly rich, and perfectly flat ground, intersected and bounded by several large rivers, and some bog land, capable of the most profitable system of drainage, and traversed for a distance of fifteen miles by a highly finished, substantial railway," and adjacent to the " city and seaport of Kingston, with its 40,000 inhabitants;" and also to the " rich and flat district around Spanish Town, with several small villages, numerous grazing farms, and fifty to sixty fine sugar estates, with room for five times as many more," he adds: " although sugar is the chief cultivation, there are not now, even in good seasons, more than 5,000 to 6,000 tons produced," whereas, by a proper use of the water power, available in the neighbourhood, that amount could easily be five times multiplied--(pp. 30, 31.) "Free villages," as they are termed, have been extensivel established; they had their origin in the constant isputes between a large and respectable portion of the emancipated negroes and their former masters, who in many...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 208 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 381g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236864700
  • 9781236864703