The British Cicero; Or, a Selection of the Most Admired Speeches in the English Language Arranged Under Three Distinct Heads of Popular, Parliamentary

The British Cicero; Or, a Selection of the Most Admired Speeches in the English Language Arranged Under Three Distinct Heads of Popular, Parliamentary

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1808 edition. Excerpt: ... body of volunteers; another gentleman thought it was addressed to the original and respsctable volunteers; take it either way--if addressed to the new new created volunteers, it was for the purposes of sedition--and if to the old original volunteers, it would be ftill more dangerous if they were to succeed with them in altering the constitution by force. It is dated, ' William Drennan, president. Archibald Hamilton Rowan, secretary.' This is a strong presumption that Mr. Rowan was acquainted with every part of the paper; it professes upon the face of it that he was secretary of this society. I shall come, by and by, to the question of publication; if he published it, there does arise a presumption that he knew what he published: I go no farther with that observation. He says, ' Citizen Soldiers, you first took up arms to protect your country from foreign enemies and from domestic disturbances; for the same purposes it now becomes necessary that you should resume them.' Citizen Soldiers, you first took up armG, that is, in my judgment, you took them up originally for these two purposes; it now becomes necessary you should resume them for those purposes. ' A proclamation had been issued in England for embodying the militia, and one in Ireland for repressing seditious associations; in consequence of both these proclamations it is reasonable to apprehend danger from abroad and danger at home.' The printed paper has been proved and read it says, ' For whence but from apprehended danger are those menacing preparations for war drawn through the streets of this capital (inuendo, meaning the city of Dublin)? or whence, if not to create that internal commotion which was not found, to shake that credit which was not affected, to blast'that volunteer honour..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236579100
  • 9781236579102