A Brief History of Printing in America; Containing a Brief Sketch of the Development of the Newspaper and Some Notes on Publishers Who Have Especially Contributed to Printing

A Brief History of Printing in America; Containing a Brief Sketch of the Development of the Newspaper and Some Notes on Publishers Who Have Especially Contributed to Printing

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ...of the United States of a provision prohibiting slavery made further work for abolition unnecessary. When Mr. Garrison started the Liberator he was his own writer, compositor, and pressman, preparing and collecting all the copy and doing the entire work of making the paper. He headed his first issue with this statement, "I am in earnest--I will not excuse--I will not retract a single inch--and I will be heard." The vigorous work of the Liberator, of course, stirred up violent opposition. The State of Georgia offered $5,000 for his apprehension, dead or alive. He was often threatened with death and on one occasion he was dragged through the streets of Boston with a rope around his body by an angry mob who intended to hang him. He was rescued, however, by some friends and sheltered in jail under some formal charge until the matter had cooled down sufficiently for him to be safely discharged. In spite of opposition Mr. Garrison lived up to every word of his ringing inaugural, and he will always be remembered as one of the foremost and probably the most effective of champions of the liberation of the slave. THEODORE LOW DE VINNE--1828-1914 Mr. De Vinne stands by common consent as the greatest American printer of his day. Like the others whom we have mentioned, he began work early, having been apprenticed at fourteen in the office of the Gazette, at Newbury, New York. In 1848 he went to the city of New York where he worked in several places as a printer, finally settling in the office of Francis Hart in 1850. He soon became foreman of Mr. Hart's establishment and in 1858 was admitted to a junior partnership. In 1877 Mr. Hart died. In his will he provided especially for the care of Mr. De Vinne's interest and arranged that he should be the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236582101
  • 9781236582102