A Brief History of Ancient, Mediaeval, and Modern Peoples; With Some Account of Their Monuments, Institutions, Arts, Manners and Customs

A Brief History of Ancient, Mediaeval, and Modern Peoples; With Some Account of Their Monuments, Institutions, Arts, Manners and Customs

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ...lasted a hundred days, five thousand wild animals were thrown into the arena. It continued to be used for gladiatorial and wild-beast fights for nearly four hundred years. On various public occasions it was splendidly fitted up with gold, silver, or amber furniture. The Therma (public baths, literally warm waters) were constructed on the grandest scale of refinement and luxury. The Baths of Caracalla, at Rome, contained sixteen hundred rooms, adorned with precious marbles. Here were painting and sculpture galleries, libraries and museums, porticoed halls, open groves, and an imperial palace. The arts of Painting, Sculpture, and Pottery were borrowed first from the Etruscans, and then from the Greeks; in mosaics, the "Roman art," pays Zcrffl, "Is a misnomer; it Is Etruscan, Greek, Assyrian, and Egyptian art, dressed in an eclectic Roman garb by foreign artists. The Pantheon contained a Greek statne of Venus, which, it is said, had in one ear the half of the pearl left by Cleopatra. To ornament a Greek marble statue representing a goddess with part of the earring of an Egyptian princess, is highly characteristic of Roman taste in matters of art." Romans excelled. In later times, Rome was filled with the magnificent spoils taken from conquered provinces, especially Greece. Greek artists flooded the capital, bringing their native ideality to serve the ambitious desires of the more practical Romans, whose dwellings grew more and more luxurious, until exquisitely-frescoed wiills, mosaic pavements, rich paintings, and marble statues became common ornaments in hundreds of elegant villas. 3. THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS. General Character.--However much they might come in contact, the Roman and the Greek character never assimilated. We have...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 204 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 372g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123663571X
  • 9781236635716