A Brief Greek Syntax and Hints on Greek Accidence; With Some Reference to Comparative Philology, and with Illustrations from Various Modern Languages

A Brief Greek Syntax and Hints on Greek Accidence; With Some Reference to Comparative Philology, and with Illustrations from Various Modern Languages

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1876 edition. Excerpt: ...or rest upon; and with the accusative motion with a view to superposition (Donaldson). See note 1' on preceding page. 1' an-p_l and 1'1rb are never nsedmrith the dative in the New Testament. I This temporal meaning of lvrl is partly derived from the participles iv. Merci with (connected with pezroq, German mit) implies separable connection.. a. With the genitive = with, (Lat. cum) accompanied by (but never our ' with ' in the sense of an instrument, as ' with a sword '). /3. With the dative = among (only in poetry). 1. With the accusative = ' after, ' either in space or time; e.g. fir'; 5: ' per' 'I5o;ierr';a he went after (i.e. in quest of) Idomeneus; We rain-a after these things. Our 'after' has the same two meanings, for we say (colloquially), ' To send after a person, a book, ' &c. Succession in place and time are constantly confused, as in the word ' interval, ' used of time, but properly a space between two ramparts. v.-n-apin beside (apud). a. With the genitive, from, 'M7e'iv vrapci 1-wog=venir de chez quelqu'un.,8. With the dative, near, 51/ vrapa-rt;, Bame'i he was with the king. 'y. With the accusative, towards. All its shades of meanings with the accusative are derived from the notion of 'motion near, or with a view to conjunction.' iel/at vrapiz. rfiag to g0 10 the ships. vrapa Bin/a ()acents'1m1rc along the sea beach. with which it is generally joined; we use a very similar phrase when we say 'upon this'=when this happened; ' Upon his coming to the throne, ' &c. In several of its meanings 1: -2 resembles the German auf; which is used both of hillshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 62 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236872983
  • 9781236872982