A Brief Enquiry Into the Causes of Premature Decay, in Our Wooden Bulwarks; With an Examination of the Means, Best Calculated to Prolong Their Duration

A Brief Enquiry Into the Causes of Premature Decay, in Our Wooden Bulwarks; With an Examination of the Means, Best Calculated to Prolong Their Duration

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1812 edition. Excerpt: ...Review observes, that it is not altogether new, and that ships have been built under coverings in Sweden. This furnishes no reason why it should not be adopted in this country, or that it is less useful here than any where else; and I hope the words of a learned judge are not inapplicable on this occasion--" He is the inventor who is the first promoter."f This well conducted work, The Quarterly Review, certainly the most eminent of the kind published in London, draws its inference by comparing ships built in docks. I have not once mentioned the building of ships in docks, knowing such a practice to be impregnated with many evils; my observations were on covered slips: nor would I ever recommend a ship to be even repaired in a dock, if it could be done otherwise with facility. fWe owe the new system of education to Mr. Lancaster; and are indebted to Dr. Jenner for vaccination. Though the first discovery may not be respectively given to either, still they richly deserve the palm, Screw fastenings have been lately applied, to secure the ends of all the beams in his Majesty's ship Dublin, being considered the only power that could effectually answer the purpose. If this ship be so well secured, why might not others be preserved to the service in a similar way? It may be alledged, that the decomposition of the copper, on the points of the bolts, aided by marine salts, will so fasten the nuts, by its oxyde, as to prevent them, in many instances, from being moved: supposing it to be so, it does not set aside the power the screw may have, in binding the work together.., The entire abolition of treenails is equally essential to the preservation of our ships, and has been partially adopted. Some copper bolts have been driven, into each plank in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236506200
  • 9781236506207