Brand's Popular Antiquities of Great Britain; Faiths and Folklore; A Dictionary of National Beliefs, Superstitions and Popular Customs, Past and Current, with Their Classical and Foreign Analogues, Described and Illustrated. Volume 3

Brand's Popular Antiquities of Great Britain; Faiths and Folklore; A Dictionary of National Beliefs, Superstitions and Popular Customs, Past and Current, with Their Classical and Foreign Analogues, Described and Illustrated. Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...faire and a newe Hall, made a royallo feast for theire friends, which they call their house-warming." It would not be difficult to accumulate instances of the use of the term in later correspondence; but I do not happen to have met with any earlier example. Pepys, in his Diary, Nov. 1, 1666, notes haying received a noble cake as a gift, and going the same day with his wife and others, and the addition of some wine, to house-warm Betty Michell. The ceremony has long been exclusively performed at the cost of the householder himself. Houseleek.--It was thought formerly (and the idea is not perhaps entirely extinct) "that if the herb houseleek, or syngreen, do grow on the house-top, the same house is never stricken with lightning or thunder." It is still common in many parts of England, to plant the herb house-leek upon the tops of cottage houses. Howe-Dance.--The Court-dance. Halliwell. Huers.--Persons employed to watch on the Cornish coasts, and to give the alarm through a long trumpet, which they carry, of the approach or the shoals of pilchards. Hugh's St., Day--The best popular account of St. Hugh, Bishop of Lincoln, may be read in Hone's "Every-Day Book," under Nov. 17. This was also the Shoemakers' feast, St. Hugh being the patron of the "gentle craft," and from a notice in "The Christmas Prince," 1G07, the fraternity are to be suspected of having sometimes overstepped the bounds of strict decorum and sobriety on the great professional holiday: "Bouzer I am not, but mild, sober Tuesday, As catt in cap case, if I light not on St. Hewsday." Compare Queen Elizabeth's Accession. Hunt the Slipper.--This game is noticed by Rogers in the "Pleasures of Memory," 1. 35: "Twas...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 562 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 29mm | 989g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236863534
  • 9781236863539