Brand's Popular Antiquities of Great Britain; Faiths and Folklore a Dictionary of National Beliefs, Superstitions and Popular Customs, Past and Current, with Their Classical and Foreign Analogues, Described and Illustrated Volume 2

Brand's Popular Antiquities of Great Britain; Faiths and Folklore a Dictionary of National Beliefs, Superstitions and Popular Customs, Past and Current, with Their Classical and Foreign Analogues, Described and Illustrated Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...under him. It appears from Bishop Kennett, that the quintain was anciently a customary sport at weddings. He says it. was used in his time at Blackthorne and at Deddington, in Oxfordshire. Gloss, to P. A. and Blount says: "It is a game or sport still in request at marriages, in some parts of this nation, especially in Shropshire: the manner now corruptly thus: --a quintain, buttress, or thick plank of wood is set fast in the ground of the high-way, where the bride and bridegroom are to pass; and poles are provided; with which the young men run a tilt on horseback, and he that breaks most poles, and shews most activity, wins the garland." But he may be presumed to refer to the period anterior to the Civil War. Glossographia, 1G56, in v. Owen's description of the quintain as played at weddings seems to indicate a much milder diversion than that form of it usually practised. He says: "A pole is fixt in the ground, with sticks set about it, which the bridegroom and his company take up, and try their strength and activity in breaking them upon the pole." Welsh Diet. v. Quintan. The quintain was one of the snorts practised by the Cornish men in July on Halgaver Moor, near Bodmin. The method of plaving at it as described in a newspaper of 1789 is exactly correspondent with that emploved bv our conntrymen in Stow's time and in Fitz-tephen's. "On Off'ham Green." says Histed. "there stands a quintain, a thing now rarely to be met with, being a machine much used in former times by youth, as well to try their own activity, as the swiftness of their horses in running at it. (He gives an engraving of it.) The cross-niece of it is broad at one end, and oierced full of holes; and a bag of sand is hung at the other, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 278 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 499g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236618858
  • 9781236618856