Boswell's Life of Johnson, Including Boswell's Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides, and Johnson's Diary of a Journey Into North Wales Volume 1

Boswell's Life of Johnson, Including Boswell's Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides, and Johnson's Diary of a Journey Into North Wales Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ... one of Cave's collateral descendants, which I have seen, dated May 3,1754, and headed, ' Present state of the late Mr. Edward Cave's effects, ' I found entered 'Magazine, 3,000. Daily Advertiser, 900.' The total value of the effects was 8,708. Johnson records of his friend that ' one of the last acts of reason which he exerted was fondly to press the hand that is now writing this little narrative.' Works, vi. 433. ' See Hawkins's Johnson, p. 189. return. 298 Dedication of his Dictionary. a.d. 1754. return. I remember having mentioned this story to George Lord Lyttelton, who tolt me, he was very intimate with Lord Chesterfield; and hoi ling it as a well-known truth, defended Lord Chesterfield, by saying, that ' Cibber, who had been introduced familiarly by the back-stairs, had probably not been there above ten minutes.' It may seem strange even to entertain a doubt concerning a story so long and so widely current, and thus implicitly adopted, if not sanctioned, by the authority which I have mentioned; but Johnson himself assured me, that there was not the least foundation for it. He told me, that there never was any particular incident which produced a quarrel between Lord Chesterfield and him; but that his Lordship's continued neglect was the reason why he resolved to have no connection with him1. When the Dictionary was upon the eve of publication, Lord Chesterfield, who, it is said, had flattered himself with expectations that Johnson would dedicate the work to him', attempted, in a courtly manner, to sooth, and insinuate 1 Lord Chesterfield writing to his son in 1751 (Letters, iii. 136) said: --' People in high life are hardened to the wants and distresses of mankind, as surgeons are to their bodily pa1ns; they see and hear of them all day long, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 238 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 431g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236674561
  • 9781236674562