Boswell's Life of Johnson; Including Boswell's Journal of Atour to the Hebrides and Johnson's Diary of a Journey Into North Wales Volume 2;

Boswell's Life of Johnson; Including Boswell's Journal of Atour to the Hebrides and Johnson's Diary of a Journey Into North Wales Volume 2;

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...Johnson praised John Bunyan highly. 'His Pilgrims Progress has great merit, both for invention, imagination, and the conduct of the story; and it has had the best evidence of its merit, the general and continued approbation of mankind. Few books, I believe, have had a more extensive sale. It is remarkable, that it begins very much like the poem of Dante; yet there was no translation of Dante when Bunyan wrote. There is reason to think that he had read Spenser V and translate them? No letters or state papers from which you could correct their errors, or authenticate their narration, or supply their defects.' J. H. Burton's Hume, ii. 83. 'See ante, ii. 53. Southey, asserting that Robertson had never read the Laws of Alonso the Wise, says, that 'it is one of the thousand and one omissions for which he ought to be called rogue as long as his volumes last.' Southey's Life, ii. 318. 'Ovid, de Art. Amand. i. iii. v. 13 339-Boswell. 'It may be that our name too will mingle with those.' 3 The Gent. Mag. for Jan. 1766 (p. 45) records, that 'a person was observed discharging musket-balls from a steel crossbow at the two re maining heads upon Temple Bar.' They were the heads of Scotch rebels executed in 1746. Samuel Rogers, who died at the end of 1855, said, 'I well remember one of the heads of the rebels upon a pole at Temple Bar.' Rogers's Table-Tolk, p. 2. 4 In allusion to Dr. Johnson's supposed political principles, and perhaps his own. Boswell s' Dr. Johnson one day took Bishop Percy's little daughter upon his knee, and asked her what she thought of Pilgrim's Progress. The child answered that she had not read it. "No!" replied the Doctor; "then I would not give one farthing for you: " and he set her down and took no further notice of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 210 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 386g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236655303
  • 9781236655301