The Border Antiquities of England and Scotland; Comprising Specimens of Architecture and Sculpture, and Other Vestiges of Former Ages, Accompanied by

The Border Antiquities of England and Scotland; Comprising Specimens of Architecture and Sculpture, and Other Vestiges of Former Ages, Accompanied by

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1814 edition. Excerpt: ... all things were quiet," says Sir Robert Carey, " and the watch set at night, after supper, about ten of the clock, I took one of my men's liveries, and put it about me, and took two other of my servants with me in their liveries, and we three, as the warden's men, came to the provost-marshal's where Bourne was, and were let into his chamber. We sat down by him, and told him that we were desirous to see him, because we heard he was stout and valiant, and true to his friend, and that we were sorry our master could not be moved to save his life. He voluntarily of himself said, that he had lived long enough to do so many villanies as he had done, and withal told us, that he had lain with P In revenge of the death of this man, Sir Robert Kerr very nearly surprised a party of Carey's servants at Norhara, who must have been cut to pieces, had they not, by their master's command, slept that night in the castle. The dissention between these two officers continued, until, upon such an occasion as we have noticed, p. cix, Cessfurd, along with the Lord of Buccleuch, was appointed to be delivered into England, when, with that sort of generous confidence which qualified the ferocity of the Border character, he chose his enemy, Sir Robert Carey, for his guardian; after which they lived on the most amicable terms with each other. about forty men's wives, what in England what in Scotland; and that he had killed seven Englishmen with his own hands, cruelly murdering them; that he had spent his whole time in whoring, drinking, stealing, and taking deep revenge for slight offences."--Memoirs, p. 73. Such tracts are like a glimpse of sunshine amid the lowering of a storm. Carey relates the circumstances which led to these agreements in the pithy style...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 188.98 x 246.13 x 3.56mm | 140.61g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 123664459X
  • 9781236644596